• The Japanese House

The Japanese House

The new exhibition at the Barbican explores Architecture and Life in Japan after 1945

The Japanese House

The new exhibition at the Barbican explores Architecture and Life in Japan after 1945

A new exhibition at the Barbican, ‘The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945’ discusses the relationship between architecture and the domestic household. It discusses the home as a living organism – timeless and organic. In Japanese culture the house takes centre stage.

The Japanese House

About the Exhibition

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945 is held at the Barbican Art Gallery, Barbican Centre. The gallery features over forty architects ranging from renowned 20th century masters to young rising stars. As well as architecture, the exhibition also includes film and photography casting a new light on the role of the house in Japanese culture.

The Japanese House

The Organic Home

The exhibition unfolds around the gallery like a clock, taking you though the modern history of Japanese architecture and ending with a full-sized recreation of the Moriyama House by architect Ryue Nishizawa. This is considered to be one of the most important houses of the 21st century, because of its original use of individual units instead of rooms. These units provide a geometric and mathematical aesthetic. This concept is key to Japanese architecture. Visitors to the gallery are invited to explore the house which has been brought to life with intimate detailing in the form of books, music and films.

The Japanese House

Junzo Yoshimura – one the key architects featured- worked using a juxtaposition of concreate and natural materials. This is a key feature in Japanese architecture, due to the country’s large forest landscape. This setting inspired a way of life; Yoshimura spoke of his desire to live ‘like a bird on top of a tree’.

The Japanese House

Concrete Comfort

The exhibition also discusses the concept of the home as a ‘contained world’ that protects from the contradictions of society. This idea was visually shown through exposed structure and reinforced concrete. On display is Kosuke Tsumura’s ‘Final Home Unisex Coat’, a garment designed to be your home. It could be stuffed with newspaper for insulation, cushions for comfort, or emergency items and personal belongings for evacuation. This plays with the idea of the home as comfort and security.

The Japanese House

At Trendstop we have identified this concept within our F/W 2018-19 forecast themes. Architectural 3D forms and clean lines are apparent within structure. There is also a big focus on organic and natural materials which are favoured mediums for Japanese architects.

The Japanese House

The exhibition is open from March 23rd, to book tickets visit the Barbican website.

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